Everyday Stewardship

11-19-2017Stewardship Reflection

We may long to hear the Lord say to us, “Well done, good and faithful servant,” as He does with the first two servants mentioned in the Parable of the Talents in today’s Gospel from Matthew. However, although the third servant did not squander or waste the gifts (talents) he had received, the Master’s reaction was not the same.

As we have often stated, stewardship is an active way of life. There is nothing passive about it. The Lord expects us to do things, to take the gifts we receive and to share them and multiply them, as was the case in the first two servants cited in the parable.

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Everyday Stewardship

11-12-2017Stewardship Reflection

“Therefore, stay awake, for you know neither the day nor the hour.” Christ cautions us often concerning our sense of conversion and timing. It has a lot to do with procrastination — that is, putting something off or delaying something which needs to be accomplished.

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Everyday Stewardship

11-05-2017Stewardship Reflection

There is no question that Jesus had a way with words. The Word of the Lord is filled with what we are very familiar with in our society — sound bites if you will, which convey so much meaning. The last verses of today’s Gospel from St. Matthew contain one of those short statements which carry so much more meaning. Jesus says, “The greatest among you must be your servant. Whoever exalts himself will be humbled, but whoever humbles himself will be exalted.”

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Everyday Stewardship

10-29-2017Stewardship Reflection

In today’s Gospel Reading from St.  Matthew, A lawyer among the Pharisees again tries to entrap Jesus by asking Him the question, “Teacher, which commandment in the law is the greatest.” Jesus’ response appears multiple times in Holy Scripture, as He says, “You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind.” The Lord then adds another that He cites as almost equally important, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

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Everyday Stewardship

10-22-2017Stewardship Reflection

The last line of today’s Gospel Reading from St. Matthew contains one of the more well known of Jesus’ quotes. When asked a bit of a trick question by the Pharisees, “Is it lawful to pay the census tax to Caesar or not?” Jesus responds by asking them whose image is on their Roman coins, to which they respond simply “Caesar’s.”

Jesus’ response to their reply is known to most of us, “Then repay to Caesar what belongs to Caesar and to God what belongs to God.” The Lord’s answer is far more perceptive than we might think, and it gives another message to us, one we must always remember. If we are followers of Christ, and if we work to be His disciple, the Lord might ask us, “Whose image is on your soul?” We have learned in the First Chapter of Genesis that God created us in His image.

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Everyday Stewardship

10-15-2017Stewardship Reflection

Today’s Gospel from the Book of Matthew again includes parables. We have been hearing the Lord share parables with us throughout our readings in recent weeks. Interestingly Matthew contains 23 parables (or teachings classified as parables), while Luke has 28. Mark has only nine, and John has none.

The first parable we hear today is called The Parable of the Wedding Feast. In this story shared by Jesus for our benefit, a king is hosting a wedding feast for his son. He sends out invitations and people ignore them or choose not to respond. It may seem somewhat remarkable to us that people turn down an invitation to a royal wedding feast.

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Everyday Stewardship

10-08-2017Stewardship Reflection

One of St. Paul’s favorite topics was prayer, and today’s reading from his letter to the Philippians is no exception to that. He says, “Have no anxiety at all, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, make your requests known to God.” For Paul all topics are appropriate for prayer because we need to share and consult with the Lord about everything.

God knows what is on our minds already, of course, but He also desires that we make a conscious effort to communicate with Him on these subjects. In addition, Paul points out that our prayers need to be infused with thanksgiving. We should not just petition the Lord and make requests. It is equally important that we think about, identify, and acknowledge our blessings.

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Everyday Stewardship

10-01-2017Stewardship Reflection

St. Paul offers a formula for living the way we are supposed to live as Christians in the Second Reading. Paul writes, “Do nothing out of selfishness or out of vainglory; rather, humbly regard others as more important than yourselves.” Doing that is a challenge for most all of us. Yet, that is one of the secrets to being a good steward and living as Christ wants us to live.

To truly live that way requires a dramatic conversion. All of us know people who are so self-centered that they often are not even aware that they are totally unwilling to compromise or to even recognize the value of those around them. Achieving this kind of self-awareness, of what kind of a person we are, is a significant step on our faith and life journeys.

Screenwriter and playwright William Nicholson once wrote, “God does not necessarily want us to be happy. He wants us to be lovable, worthy of love, able to be loved by Him. What makes people hard to love? It is called selfishness. Selfish people are hard to love because so little love comes out of them.”

That is our challenge, to love others in such a way that we become lovable as well. Christ told us over and over that the secret to being His disciple and the secret to being a good steward is to 

“Love your neighbor.” That is how to be the kind of person Paul calls us to be as well.